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Samuel Beckett

CALL FOR PAPERS

THEATRE HISTORIOGRAPHY WORKING GROUP

IFTR Hyderabad, 5-10 July 2015

The IFTR Historiography Working Group will be meeting during the IFTR conference in Hyderabad, India, 5-10 July 2015. The working group welcomes papers dealing with any possible period or topic in theatre history, but as the group is dedicated to theatre historiography, the author is asked to contemplate the historiographical implications of his or her research projects.

The general theme of the upcoming conference, Theatre and Democracy, has various critical implications for the study of theatre history. As noted in the description of the conference theme: “The practice of theatre, as it exists within and made possible by the matrix of socio-economic-political structures, often regulated by notions of national culture, cannot but engage with democracy, with issues of policy, resources, institutional and infrastructural spaces, along with the problems of authority, access, control, censorship, freedom, etc. In today’s context, it is imperative to open up these relations that facilitate and shape theatre practice to expose the political, aesthetic and social aspects of the politics of inclusion, exclusion and representation.” The theatre historian is continually faced with questions about the contextual conditions of theatre, including questions of authority, inclusion, exclusion, and control, as well as questions on the social and political implications of the practice of historical research. The Historiography Working Group welcomes, but does not confine itself, to papers addressing the theme of the conference. See the conference website, http://www.iftr2015hyd.in/, for a full elaboration of the topics.

The Historiography Working Group works by circulating papers to members in advance of the conference. Those who have circulated papers are invited to speak for not more than ten minutes about the context in which they have written their pieces, and about points where they would particularly welcome a response. (Participants take care to read all the papers carefully, so an oral summary of the paper is discouraged.) Submissions are normally linked to a research project that the author currently has in progress. The group spends about 20 minutes discussing each paper, and the emphasis of the discussion is upon historiographical method rather than the detail of the content. The aim of the discussion is always to be constructive. It is a way of working that has been found helpful by young scholars inexperienced in presentation, and by scholars whose first language is not English, but it has evolved because it suits the needs of those who are working on a larger project, which is often seen to be growing from year to year. We shall particularly welcome proposals from new scholars and from scholars outside Europe.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be submitted by 31 January 2015 on the Cambridge Journals website: http://journals.cambridge.org/iftr, indicating that you are submitting to the Historiography Working Group. Please see the conference website for further instructions on submitting abstracts.

The Working Group conveners reserve the right to select proposals that best fit the historiographical theme of our meeting and may ask for revisions. We will respond to proposals received by 15February 2015. The full text of the selected papers (no more than 5000 words) must be emailed to the conveners by 1 June 2015, for uploading onto the group’s website. For further information please do not hesitate to contact one of the conveners.

 

Information about the group can be found on http://www.firt-iftr.org/working-groups/methodologies/historiography and http://theaterhistoriography.wordpress.com/

The current conveners of the Historiography Working Group are 

Janne Risum This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Aarhus University, Denmark

Magnus Thor Thorbergsson (
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ) Iceland Academy of the Arts

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Mechele Leon ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ) University of Kansas

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CALL FOR PAPERS
MUSIC THEATRE WORKING GROUP
IFTR 2015, Hyderabad, India
5 - 10 July, 2015
http://www.iftr2015hyd.in/

THE IFTR MUSIC THEATRE WORKING GROUP
The Music Theatre Working Group is concerned with a broad range of methodological and theoretical perspectives on all kinds of music theatre, from opera and popular forms (such as Broadway musicals), and contemporary experiments with new forms of music theatre, to issues of sound and musicality in theatre and performance.

IFTR CONFERENCE 2015
For the coming conference in Hyderabad, the Working Group invites papers that address the conference theme, ‘Theatre and Democracy’, or any aspect of following areas, from a historical, anthropological, philosophical / theoretical, pedagogical or interdisciplinary perspective:

1.     The Politics of Sound in Music-Theatre.
We define politics not just as the activities of state and governments but as systems and structures of power, its distribution, and their corresponding principles, purposes and consequences. By music-theatre, we wish to consider not just musicals or operatic forms but all forms of theatre and performance that employ music and sound as a structural and structuring principle. These could include dance-drama, composed theatre, ‘post-operatic’ music theatre, experimental music theatre, avant-garde practices, contemporary theatre and performance art.

·       Acoustic ecologies of nationhood and nationality

·       The political economy of music theatre

·       Local and Global soundscapes

·       Postcolonial politics, performance and sound

·       Cultural politics and music in performance

·       Sonicities of culture: performance and reception

·       Identity, accent and the voice

·       Opera and nationhood

·       Gender politics, gendered vocalities

·       Democratic soundscapes

·       The politics of silence

·       The politics of noise

2.     Dramaturgies of Music-Theatre
In this strand, the interaction of music, sound and other theatrical elements in theatre and performance, including issues of production, performativity, and meaning-making, would be considered. Certainly not limited to music-theatre or musicals, these intersections, connections and crossings could be analysed from the following perspectives:

·       Acoustemologies of music (in) theatre

·       Sonic architectures and sound design

·       Theatre sound (and noise)

·       Materialities of sound in performance

·       Sound, space and place

·       Phenomenologies of seeing and hearing

·       Semiotics of sound and stage

·       Voice and vocality in/and/as performance

·       Audiences: Spectatorship and reception

·       Dramaturgies of success / failure

·       Perspectives of genre: music theatre, musical theatre

·       Role of critics

·       Commercial and/vs artistic considerations

 

3.     The Actor-Singer-Dancer
Specific to musical theatre, the focus here would be issues surrounding the ‘triple-threat actor’ – a phrase used to describe a performer that acts, sings and dances. These could include, but are not limited to:

·       Theory, training and practice

·       Musicality and rhythm as schematics

·       Hearing & listening as processes

·       Movement, modulation and the voice

·       Music, movement and text

·       Performative intersections of the actor, singer and dancer


SUBMISSION PROCEDURES

Papers will be circulated in advance of the conference so that the scheduled time would be used productively for debate, discussion and feedback.

Abstracts of 300 words must be submitted to the Cambridge Journals Online website
http://journals.cambridge.org/iftr before 31 January 2015. A short bio of 50 words should also be included. Do note that a current IFTR/FIRT member is needed to submit an abstract. In addition, the WG convenors would require a copy of the abstract to be sent to them via email (contacts listed blow).


Completed papers of no more than 3,000 words should be submitted to the convenors by 8 June 2015. These will then be circulated to all WG members attending the conference. More details will follow at a later date via email. Updates, as well as the WG meeting schedules, would also be placed on the Working Group’s webpage. Do visit the Music Theatre WG’s homepage on the IFTR website.

 

Convenors:
Marcus Tan (
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

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George Rodosthenous ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

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Call for Papers

Theatre Architecture Working Group

FIRT/IFTR 2015, Hyderabad, India

5 - 10 July, 2015

http://www.iftr2015hyd.in/

 

Deadline for Proposals: 31 January 2015

Deadline for bursary application: 15 December 2014

 

The Theatre Architecture Working Group of the International Federation for Theatre Research (FIRT/IFTR) invites paper proposals for our forthcoming Working Group meeting at the IFTR conference in Hyderabad, India, in July 2015. The aim of the group is to explore all that theatre architecture has been historically, is at present, and might be in the future and to articulate the many contemporary sites of exchange between the fields of theatre, performance and architecture. For our meeting in Hyderabad we invite contributions that address questions of ‘Interdisciplinary Practice’. We seek to use the meeting as an opportunity to gather research which we hope to publish in a special issue of a peer-reviewed journal. We invite contributions from scholars and practitioners whose work closely addresses one of the following sets of concerns through which we will explore our theme:

 

1.     Theatre architecture and performance space

What are the key contemporary developments in the design of architecture for theatre and performance? How have European theatre typologies been adapted, appropropriated or contested by indigenous or local cultural concerns? We invite critical case studies and broader arguments about built, unbuilt or speculative theatre architecture projects, including new readings of historic theatres and arguments about theatre architecture today. Topics might include (but need not be limited to):

  • new or planned theatre projects - especially from South and East Asia.
  • re-readings or re-thinkings of historic theatre architecture in the light of recent theory
  • theories and arguments about historic preservation, conservation or the renovation of theatre buildings
  • theatre buildings as drivers for urban regeneration
  • questions about the relevance of the traditional playhouse in the twenty-first century
  •  traditional versus modern, contemporary and/or experimental designs for theatres
  • dominant traditions, local traditions and questions of cultural influence and/or appropriation

 

2.     The architectural in theatre/performance practice

Where might we locate the architectural and architectonic in theatre and performance practice? We invite studies and discussion of theatre/performance practices that closely engage, radically undermine, critically re-examine or nakedly depend on architecture for their meaning and value. Topics might include (but need not be limited to):

  • appropriations of architectural concepts and practices to performance-making (e.g. the uses of construction in performance, dramaturgy, or devised performance practice, or the structuring of action and event)
  • collaborations between performance-makers and architects
  • performance-installation and other examples of architecture as drama
  • spatial dramaturgies in performance (e.g. immersive or promenade performances where the logic is spatial rather than chronological)
  • choreographic tools that engage with the ‘architecture’ of movement (e.g. US choreographer William Forsythe’s ‘choreographic objects’)
  • spatial experimentation and/or the re-structuring of performer-spectator roles (e.g. Bengali playwright/director Badal Sarkar)
  •  discussion of the materiality of theatre/performance
  •  examples of ‘critical spatial practice’ as it manifests within theatre/performance
  • site-specific theatre and/or ‘found space’ theatres

 

3.     The performative or theatrical in architecture

What are the strengths and limitations of ‘performance architecture’ as distinct from ‘performative architecture’? What methodologies, ideologies and effects are beginning to attach to these two strands of performance-influenced architecture practice? How are these issues and these practices understood outside of US/European contexts? Where next for architecture that is performatively or theatrically-inclined? Topics might include (but need not be limited to):

  • architectural practices that employ performance methodologies and/or performativity and/or theatricality to transform our experiences in and of the built environment.
  • theatricalism and/or theatricality in architecture
  • performance architecture
  • performative architectures
  • applications of performance theory and/or practice in architecture 
  • buildings and the ‘performance’ of power
  • architecture’s attention to the body and/or lived experience and/or ideas about event-space, narrative, drama, agency, improvisation, temporality and affect
  • spatial dramaturgies and other playful practices in architecture and/or urban planning which refigure space and form by enacting them differently
  • discussion of temporality or ephemerality in architecture
  • examples of ‘critical spatial practice’ as it manifests within architecture

 

Submission Procedures

Abstracts should be submitted through the IFTR’s online system, which contains detailed instructions. Please visit http://www.iftr2015hyd.in/, and send a back-up copy to the WG co-convenors.

The deadline for submission of abstracts is 31 January 2015.

Additional information such as the form the proposed submission will take, or information about restrictions to your availability over the course of the IFTR World Congress, should be included on the online form under ‘equipment required’ and must be discussed (via email) with the co-convenors.

 If you wish to attend the conference in Hyderabad, India, in 2015 but could have financial difficulty, IFTR/FIRT invites you to apply for a bursary. http://www.firt-iftr.org/item/380-call-for-bursary-application-iftr-2015-conference-hyderabad-5-10-july. A bursary application form is available via the IFTR website and completed forms must be sent to Milena Grass, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 15 December 2014. Bursary holders MUST ATTEND THE FULL CONFERENCE and not miss sessions!

 

About the IFTR Theatre Architecture Working Group

The purpose of the Theatre Architecture Working Group is to explore all that theatre architecture has been historically, is at present, and might be in the future. We consider built projects alongside unbuilt or speculative architectures, studying these from a wide range of practical and theoretical perspectives. We continue to investigate the ways in which space can be manipulated to bring performers and spectators into dynamic relationship inside traditional theatre auditoria, while also asking how else the disciplines of theatre and architecture inter-sect. Over the next four years, we will be focusing on three major strands of enquiry: 1) theatre projects (especially those that provide insights into performing arts venues beyond Europe and North America); 2) inter-disciplinary practices (including performance practices that closely engage with, radically undermine, critically re-examine or nakedly depend on architecture for their meaning and value, and architectural practices which employ performance, performativity and/or theatricality to transform our experiences of the built environment); 3) inter-disciplinary pedagogies (especially those driven by the question of what is gained for students of one discipline in the encounter between that discipline and the other). We seek to develop theoretical paradigms appropriate to theatre and architecture and to the relationship between them – articulating the many contemporary sites of exchange between these fields and re-examining historical encounters in the light of recent developments in spatial theory, architecture theory and practice, and performance studies.

 

 

Working Group Convenors

Juliet Rufford: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Andrew Filmer: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Our Process

The Theatre Architecture Working Group is composed of scholars and practitioners of both disciplines from Australia, Brazil, Chile, England, Greece, Holland, Turkey, the United States, and Wales. It works by circulating papers (of approximately 3,500 words) to members in advance of the conference. Those who have circulated papers are invited to speak for around 15 minutes after which time the whole group enters into discussion and Q&A on that paper. The 15-minute presentation and response format is structured to encourage in-depth exchange.

The full text of your paper should be emailed to both convenors by Sunday 7th June 2015 for uploading into the group’s dropbox. For further information please do not hesitate to contact the convenors. You are reminded that in order to present your paper it is necessary to formally submit your abstract according to the guidelines on the conference website, register and pay for the conference and buy membership of IFTR. IFTR operates a banding system and a number of concessions - please explore your options by browsing the IFTR / IFTR 2015, Hyderabad webpages.

In addition to the group’s regular sessions, the convenors will pick three papers that seem productively inter-related to form a WG-sponsored panel within the conference’s general programme. The panel will represent the working group. If you do not wish to be chosen to be part of this panel, please indicate your wishes to the working group convenors. (Panelists would still attend the working group meetings and contribute to all WG discussions.) 

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Dear all,
I have now processed all the votes and can declare that the person elected as co-convenor of the Performance in Public Spaces Working Group is Esther Belvis Pons.

Thanks to both candidates and to everyone who participated. We will now be planning Hyderabad 2015 and be in touch shortly.

Kind regards

Tim

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96 800x600 Normal 0 false false false EN-GB JA X-NONE As its name suggests, The TAD Working Group concerns itself with three primary topics of interest with the complex interaction of these topics in the conceptualization and realization of drama, theatre and performance. The tripartite nature of the Working Group generates questions of independence, interdependence and interaction within and between constituent strands. These enquiries examine and scrutinize the boundaries of those practices, methodologies and theorizations that are situated between performative potential and performative actuality. Furthermore, they promote cross-fertilization between contemporary theatre theory and practice.    

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The Samuel Beckett working group, first convened in 1996, meets every 1–2 years at the IFTR conference. The group provides a forum for discussions of current research approaches in Beckett studies undertaken by scholars around the world. It has consistently had a wide range of international participants from Europe, the Middle East, the Americas, and Asia, and encourages new members from other regions as well.

 

Work Plan

The group sets topics for each meeting, either adopting the theme of the IFTR conference or focusing on a specific play or theory in the hope of eliciting a lively exchange of ideas. Participants' essays are circulated approximately one month prior to the meeting, and at the actual sessions presenters briefly summarize, but do not read, their papers. Group members then discuss each work in detail for at least 30 minutes, asking questions, offering constructive comments and making suggestions for further research. So far, two books have resulted from this process.

 

Publications

Drawing on Beckett: Portraits, Performances, and Cultural Perspectives. Ed. Linda Ben-Zvi. Tel Aviv: Assaph Books, 2004.

The book contains twenty-one essays by leading Beckett scholars, as well as twenty-four drawings of Beckett by his friend and noted Israeli painter, Avigdor Arikha.

Beckett at 100: Revolving It All. Edited by Linda Ben-Zvi and Angela Moorjani. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008.

This collection of twenty-two essays is based on, but not limited to, essays presented at the Trinity College, Dublin centenary celebration in April 2006. The Beckett Working Group was invited to feature in the central academic program where approximately 40 papers were presented.

 

Convenors:

Linda Ben-Zvi:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mariko Hori Tanaka:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Julie Campbell:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Next Meeting:: TBA

Last Meeting: Munich 2010. The proposed topic was 'New Approaches to Beckett's Television and Radio Dramas'.

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The New Scholars Forum also has a group on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/596044380446700/

The New Scholars’ Forum provides a supportive platform for PhD and early career researchers within IFTR to present ten minute papers on their work. These papers do not have to speak to the conference theme; they can be on any subject relevant to the New Scholar. The New Scholars’ Forum is designed to allow New Scholars to receive maximum feedback on work in progress from senior academics. New Scholars are not obliged to present in the New Scholars Forum – they can also submit longer papers to Working Groups or to General Panels.

IFTR organises targeted workshops and programmes for New Scholars during its conferences. The New Scholars’ reception provides a chance to meet members of the IFTR executive committee and to learn more about the organisation. A series of workshops with keynote speakers and other prominent theatre academics gives New Scholars the opportunity to build essential skills for a successful career. The New Scholars’ caucus, held near the end of the conference, allows New Scholars to feedback on their IFTR experiences and shape the direction of the organisation.

IFTR’s Working Groups are very welcoming of New Scholars. You can find a list of IFTR working groups on this website. If you would like to attend one, it is a good idea to contact the convener to introduce yourself. You can attend a working group without presenting a paper at one.

If you have any questions then please contact your student representative Sigríður Lára Sigurjónsdóttir at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  or the chair of the New Scholar’s Forum Jean Graham-jones at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

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MUSIC THEATRE

September, 2014

The aim of the Music Theatre working group is to discuss a broad range of methodological and theoretical perspectives on all kinds of music theatre, from opera and popular forms (such as Broadway musicals) to contemporary experiments with new forms of music theatre. The background for the working group is our perception of the need to find new ways to deal with a subject which is part of at least two disciplines – theatre studies and musicology – but which is not, in fact, at home in either field. In our experience, musicologists tend to forget about the performance aspect and theatre scholars often forget about the music, so there is no doubt that we need to discuss music theatre from an interdisciplinary perspective. What our approaches all have in common is that they start from a notion of music theatre as theatre, performance and experience, always dealing with the interplay between all of the senses. Certainly not exhaustive, some areas of concern that extend to theatre and performance, broadly understood, include:

  • Acoustemologies of theatre / performance
  • Music in / as theatre and performance
  • Performativities of song and dance
  • Materialities of the voice
  • Phenomenology of sound / music in performance
  • Hearing cultures in performance: Cultural sounds and sounds in culture
  • Politics and aesthetics of Opera
  • Politics and aesthetics of Musicals
  • Composed Theatre
  • The Broadway and British Musical
  • Experimental music theatre
  • Hermeneutics of auditory reception
  • Aurality and performance; Listening and Voice
  • Philosophies of sound / music in performance
  • Politics of silence
  • Noise / Music
  • Intersections of music, sound and the performing body
  • The Actor-Singer-Dancer

We welcome any scholar who is working on the intersections of sound / music and performance and would love to have you join us. If you would like to know more about the Working Group, or if you have changed your e-mail-address, please contact the convenors (see below).

Publications

The group has published two edited collections with essays derived from discussions of the working group and comprised of chapters contributed by individual members.

The Legacy of Opera: Music Theatre as Experience and Performance (Rodopi Press, 2013)

The first collection considers the way in which ideological and cultural assumptions have impacted on our contemporary view of music theatre, focussing in particular on the way that opera’s development as a form and status as an art has inscribed a very particular set of assumptions and expectations about the musical stage that twentieth century developments have had to negotiate. In this respect, opera is seen as a defining cultural form and practice whose shadow looms large over the popular and modernising developments of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Gestures of music theatre: the performativity of song and dance (Oxford University Press, 2013).

There are two principal questions posed through this series of essays: how do song and dance function as physical and material gestures, as dimensions or perhaps sub-sets of music theatre works? How might identities be constituted for characters, performers and audiences within and through the song and dance of music theatre? The first consideration, through a series of philosophical discussions, engages with music theatre’s substance, function and form; the second, through analyses of those song and dance gestures in a range of music theatre contexts, engages with its reception, effect and affect.

Work Plan

We will be meeting in Hyderabad, India in 2015.
More information will be available soon.

Convenors:
Marcus Tan (
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

George Rodosthenous ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

 


Last Meeting: IFTR World Congress, Warwick, UK 2014
Next Meeting: IFTR Annual Conference, Hyderabad, India 2015

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Over the past two years, members of the Feminist Research Working Group have shared work and passionate discussion about performance, feminism, affect and activism in the era we are calling our neoliberal times. Symptoms of these times include: the marketization (commodification, monetization) of everyday life; pervasive precarity as economic fact and affective condition (what David Harvey calls a “new habit of the heart”); the dismantling of state funding supporting health, education, housing, and arts institutions; the privatization of industries formally in the public trust; the aggressive unraveling of collectively won gains in gender and racial equality in favor of the new cultural fetish: the virile entrepreneurial individual.

Neoliberalism grounds itself, as Raewen Connell writes, in “existing centers of power: corporate capital, white middle-class men, major professions, managers in state and private sectors.” Yet she also points out that “neoliberal regimes have been created by stitching together a coalition of social forces and finding a locally gripping ideological language to defend them.”

Performance – embodied, culturally marked, ephemeral practices – can be part of that social stitching, and can also be its unraveling; often it is both. Performance sites might include ritual spaces, traditional theatre venues, department store elevators, corporate property, village squares, city streets, parliaments, YouTube videos or massive political spectacles. Affect theory guides us to think of new forms of relationality conducive to exploring the many vectors of feeling aroused by performance. Contending that there is no activism without affect, we want to bring feminist activism in all its affective power to to the foreground of our working group agenda.

For the Warwick Working Group meeting, we invite papers on the theme of performance, feminism, affect and activism in neoliberal times. Participants may also consider the main IFTR conference theme of Theatre and Stratification (http://iftr2014warwick.org/)

which for us would be multi-layered performances that engage the layered complexity of social experience under neoliberalism.

Abstracts for the Feminist Research Working Group should be submitted through the Cambridge Journals Online pages by 15th January, 2014. For more information on this process, go to: http://iftr2014warwick.org/?page_id=205

Our Process

The Feminist Research Working Group is composed of scholars from Sweden, India, Pakistan, Britain, China, Japan, South Korea, Chile, Spain, Germany, Canada, Australia, and the United States. It works by circulating papers to members in advance of the conference. Those who have circulated papers are invited to speak for no more than seven minutes and are paired with a respondent who offers a seven minute response. The 15 minute presentation and response format is structured to encourage cross-cultural exchange and is followed by 15 minutes for the group to discuss the work.

 

The full text of the selected papers (no more than 3000 words) should be emailed to the conveners by 1st July 2014 for uploading into the group’s dropbox. We will also publish the papers on the group’s website. For further information please do not hesitate to contact the conveners. You are reminded that in order to present your paper it is necessary to formally submit your abstract according to the guidelines on the conference website, register for the conference and to become a member of IFTR. You are also reminded that papers can be given to the working group or within the main conference, but you may not do both.

NB In addition to the group’s regular sessions, members of the Feminist Working Group may wish to form a WG-sponsored panel within the conference general program. The panel will consist of three papers representing the working group. If you are interested in forming an open panel as an alternative to presenting a paper in the group’s regular sessions, please indicate your wishes to the working group convenors. Panelists would still attend the working group meetings and contribute to the discussion. Abstracts (300 words) should be sent by email to the WG conveners by 15th December 2013. We have set this early deadline in order to respond to you before you have to make a formal submission of your abstract through the conference website on 15th January.

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