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Historiography

Since its establishment in 1993, the Historiography Working Group has aimed to encourage critical debate on methodological and epistemological problems related to the history of theatre and performance. Historiographical questions discussed by participants may be illustrated through specific case examples, and there are no restrictions on the historical time or place a proposal might involve or on the kind of historiographical approach explored. The call for papers usually proposes a historiographical theme to encourage members to consider methodological issues in their ongoing projects. We welcome papers in all stages of development: from nascent 'thought' pieces to completed book chapters, although members may find it more useful in this forum to discuss earlier rather than later drafts. Writing on the year's theme is not required, but it is helpful for readers to know the goals and context of the work and what type of feedback the author desires.

 

Completed papers are circulated among participants and read in advance of the meeting, where they are discussed rather than presented. Any FIRT/IFTR member is welcome to attend, observe, and submit a proposal. Those who have circulated papers are invited to speak for not more than ten minutes about the context in which they have written their pieces, and about points where they would particularly welcome a response. (Participants take care to read all the papers carefully, so an oral summary of the paper is discouraged.) Submissions are normally linked to a research project that the author currently has in progress. The group spends about 20 minutes discussing each paper, and the emphasis of the discussion is upon historiographic method rather than the detail of the content. The aim of the discussion is always to be constructive. It is a way of working that has been found helpful by young scholars inexperienced in presentation, and by scholars whose first language is not English, but it has evolved because it suits the needs of those who are working on a larger project, which is often seen to be growing from year to year. For those who aim to attend the group's meetings please contact the group's convenors in advance of the conference to gain access to the circulated papers.

 

Publications:

The Historiography Working Group considers itself as an open forum for debate and reflection that values exchange on methodological issues and the discussion of research. A common publication is not seen as the group's priority objective, although publications may arise from the group's meetings. Examples include: 

Thomas Postlewait and Barbara Sušec Michieli. "A Transnational Community of Scholars: The Theatre Historiography Working Group in IFTR/FIRT". In: Theater Research International 35:3 (2010). 232-249.

Barbara Sušec Michieli (ed.). Mechanisms of Control and Power. Special issue of AMFITEATER: Journal of Performing Arts Theory 1: 2 (2008).

Stephen Wilmer (ed.). Writing and Rewriting National Theatre Histories. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2004.

 

Convenors:

Janne Risum ( drajr@hum.au.dk)

Magnús Thór Thórbergsson ( magnusthor@lhi.is)

Next meeting: Warwick 2014.

Please see: http://theaterhistoriography.wordpress.com.

Last Meeting: The group last met in Barcelona, 22–26 July 2013, to focus on the theme of "Myth and Mobility"

CALL FOR PAPERS

THEATRE HISTORIOGRAPHY WORKING GROUP

IFTR Hyderabad, 5-10 July 2015

The IFTR Historiography Working Group will be meeting during the IFTR conference in Hyderabad, India, 5-10 July 2015. The working group welcomes papers dealing with any possible period or topic in theatre history, but as the group is dedicated to theatre historiography, the author is asked to contemplate the historiographical implications of his or her research projects.

The general theme of the upcoming conference, Theatre and Democracy, has various critical implications for the study of theatre history. As noted in the description of the conference theme: “The practice of theatre, as it exists within and made possible by the matrix of socio-economic-political structures, often regulated by notions of national culture, cannot but engage with democracy, with issues of policy, resources, institutional and infrastructural spaces, along with the problems of authority, access, control, censorship, freedom, etc. In today’s context, it is imperative to open up these relations that facilitate and shape theatre practice to expose the political, aesthetic and social aspects of the politics of inclusion, exclusion and representation.” The theatre historian is continually faced with questions about the contextual conditions of theatre, including questions of authority, inclusion, exclusion, and control, as well as questions on the social and political implications of the practice of historical research. The Historiography Working Group welcomes, but does not confine itself, to papers addressing the theme of the conference. See the conference website, http://www.iftr2015hyd.in/, for a full elaboration of the topics.

The Historiography Working Group works by circulating papers to members in advance of the conference. Those who have circulated papers are invited to speak for not more than ten minutes about the context in which they have written their pieces, and about points where they would particularly welcome a response. (Participants take care to read all the papers carefully, so an oral summary of the paper is discouraged.) Submissions are normally linked to a research project that the author currently has in progress. The group spends about 20 minutes discussing each paper, and the emphasis of the discussion is upon historiographical method rather than the detail of the content. The aim of the discussion is always to be constructive. It is a way of working that has been found helpful by young scholars inexperienced in presentation, and by scholars whose first language is not English, but it has evolved because it suits the needs of those who are working on a larger project, which is often seen to be growing from year to year. We shall particularly welcome proposals from new scholars and from scholars outside Europe.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be submitted by 31 January 2015 on the Cambridge Journals website: http://journals.cambridge.org/iftr, indicating that you are submitting to the Historiography Working Group. Please see the conference website for further instructions on submitting abstracts.

The Working Group conveners reserve the right to select proposals that best fit the historiographical theme of our meeting and may ask for revisions. We will respond to proposals received by 15February 2015. The full text of the selected papers (no more than 5000 words) must be emailed to the conveners by 1 June 2015, for uploading onto the group’s website. For further information please do not hesitate to contact one of the conveners.

 

Information about the group can be found on http://www.firt-iftr.org/working-groups/methodologies/historiography and http://theaterhistoriography.wordpress.com/

The current conveners of the Historiography Working Group are 

Janne Risum This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Aarhus University, Denmark

Magnus Thor Thorbergsson (
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ) Iceland Academy of the Arts

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Mechele Leon ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ) University of Kansas

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Participants are invited to orient their papers in 2014 towards part or all of the main IFTR conference theme of stratification. See the conference website for a full elaboration of the topic (http://iftr2014warwick.org/) The main conference theme invites consideration of the layering of history, how theatre marks and is rooted within history, and its relations to other historical moments or events. As stated in the conference main theme: “at the most basic level, one of the more provocative lines of inquiry that theatre historians might pursue can be distilled into the simple question: how is theatre stratified?” In relation to the theme of stratification, participants are especially encouraged to address the issue of processes of canonization, which was proposed as a topic of general interest to the group with potential for future development during the group's last meeting in Barcelona.

The group works by circulating papers to members in advance of the conference. Those who have circulated papers are invited to speak for not more than ten minutes about the context in which they have written their pieces, and about points where they would particularly welcome a response. (Participants take care to read all the papers carefully, so an oral summary of the paper is discouraged.) Submissions are normally linked to a research project that the author currently has in progress. The group spends about 20 minutes discussing each paper, and the emphasis of the discussion is upon historiographic method rather than the detail of the content. The aim of the discussion is always to be constructive. It is a way of working that has been found helpful by young scholars inexperienced in presentation, and by scholars whose first language is not English, but it has evolved because it suits the needs of those who are working on a larger project, which is often seen to be growing from year to year. We shall particularly welcome proposals from new scholars and from scholars outside Europe.

In addition to the group’s regular sessions, the Historiography Working Group will be hosting a WG-sponsored panel within the conference general program. The panel will consist of three papers representing a variety of the work and approach of the working group. If you are interested in representing the group in the open panel as an alternative to presenting a paper in the group’s regular sessions, please indicate your wishes when submitting your abstract to the convenors.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent by email to the two conveners by 15th December 2013. We have set this early deadline in order that we may be able to respond to you before you have to make a formal submission of your abstract through the conference website on 15th January. Subject to spaces being available on our programme, which operates within tight time constraints, we will be happy to consider further papers submitted on 15th Jan through the Warwick website.

The Working Group conveners reserve the right to select proposals that best fit the theme of our meeting and may ask for revisions. We will respond to proposals received by 5th January. The full text of the selected papers (no more than 5000 words) must be emailed to the conveners by 1st July 2014, for uploading onto the group’s website. For further information please do not hesitate to contact one of the conveners. You are reminded that in order to present your paper it will in due course be necessary to formally submit your abstract according to the guidelines on the conference website, register for the conference and to become a member of IFTR. You are also reminded that papers can be given to the working group or within the main conference, but you may not do both.

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Translation, Adaptation & Dramaturgy Working Group

International Federation for Theatre Research (IFTR/FIRT)

Annual Meeting – Warwick, United Kingdom, 28 July – 1 August 2014

 

Themes and Topics

For the meeting in Warwick, the IFTR Translation, Adaptation, and Dramaturgy Working Group will adopt/follow the umbrella theme of the conference: Theatre & Stratification with an emphasis on dramaturgical practice.  You may like to (re-)read the Conference’s Call for Papers elaborating that theme. Within the context of our Group’s focus, the notion of stratification, layers, and layering may apply in a wide range of ways, for instance: 

  • dramaturgy as a layering process in theatrical practice;
  • hierarchies of dramaturgy;
  • the language/s of dramaturgy;
  • the contexts, circumstances, conditions, questions, and politics that give rise to new dramaturgies;
  • new dramaturgies being produced through new technologies;
  • the layering of meaning(s) – variously rich, complex, problematic – that translation and adaptation represent dramaturgically;
  • the accumulation of successive layers of translation and/or adaptation that some texts and stories acquire;
  • the structure of relationships – often hierarchical – in the processes and practices of dramaturgy, translation, and/or adaptation;
  • the role of the audience in the dramaturgy/adaptation/translation paradigm.

 

These suggestions are not to the exclusion of translation and adaptation.  Indeed, participants may wish to propose papers with a view to the next book project that is being developed by members of the Group; that project is provisionally entitled “Practice: Dramaturgy, Translation, and Adaptation”.  This means that, while submissions focusing on the theme are particularly welcome, the Group also invites contributions that touch upon all aspects of its remit. We also warmly welcome new members, including those who wish to take part in the group's discussion but do not wish to submit a paper.

 

Format

As we reported after the meeting in Barcelona, we should like to trial in Warwick a “mixed economy” format, with a view to creating greater opportunity for wider and more concerted discussion during the Group’s sessions.  We envisage a combination of:

  • Formal papers, presented according to current practice, i.e. panels of 3-4 papers, with each speaker allocated 20 minutes with c.10 minutes of questions and discussion to follow.
  • WG members may also want to propose their own thematic panels.  These are for which papers will be circulated to all members of the Group in advance.  On the assumption that auditors will have read these papers in advance, presenters will speak briefly to their papers, summarising the principal points, and then the floor will be open for extended, in-depth discussion.
  • Round table discussions on particular topics:  3-6 people will each speak for 5-10 minutes on a topic, as provocations for a wider debate. 

In relation to this mixture of presentations, please note:

1) All contributions will require a formal proposal, with an abstract, and all successful proposals – whatever the nature of the contribution – will receive a formal letter of acceptance and an entry in the Book of Abstracts. 

2) To assist those members wishing to form a panel and who want to invite members to contribute to that panel, please email your suggested panel topic to the convenors of the group before the 21 of December.  We will then forward the suggested topic to the group asking them to respond to the panel leader directly.  Final panel topics with abstracts must be sent to both convenors as well as being submitted via CJO.

3) For round table discussion proposals as item 2 above. 

4) Abstracts (up to 300 words) will be accepted in English and French although the group’s primary working language is English.

 

Thank you.

Bernadette Cochrane and Stuart Young

Translation, Adaptation, and Dramaturgy WG co-convenors 

 

Email:   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

             This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Submission of Proposals

To submit your proposal, you must do so via the Cambridge Journals Online pages.  However, we request that you also emailing your abstract directly to the TAD Working Group convenors. Note that, for your contribution to be accepted for the conference, you need to join or renew your membership of IFTR (via the Cambridge Journals Online pages). This has to be done by 15th January 2014. For more information on this process, refer to: http://iftr2014warwick.org/?page_id=205.

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